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WHO IS SAMUS ARAN?

Even then, Brawl didn’t see her say a lot. She got four lines- “Is that all?”, “Try me.”, “You’re mine!” and “Be still...”, all of which typically stern phrases said with that steely determination in her tone. It wasn’t next month’s Other M that she started to yatter, and now she can’t stop- The game’s every cut-scene is littered with her chatting away, monologue after monologue, she’s making up for lost time.

 

Despite this seemingly never-ending silence, Samus has actually been through three voice actresses within the past five years. First up was Jennifer Hale, who became the first person to ever be Samus Aran’s official voiceover in a videogame in GameCube classic, and almost certainly Miss Aran’s finest hour, Metroid Prime. She continued through until Aliesa Glidewell took over for Brawl, probably due to Hale being stuck in a voice booth for so long during the making of Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots (In which she played Dr. Naomi Hunter, another girl who swoons after Snake.) and either not being able to get out or being sick and tired of the job. And, four lines later, Glidewell lived up to her name and flew straight out of the space scene, to be replaced by Jessica Martin, a video game novice, making her first appearance in the medium in Metroid: Other M. She reflects Samus’ mood in the game, providing a softer, more open and friendly voice than that of Glidewell. However, does this kind of tone suit Samus? Does she keep the thing up all the way through the game? These and some more important plot-related questions will be answered on September 3rd.

 

Like any girl, Samus is fond of a change of clothes. Unlike any other girl, she doesn’t like pretty dresses but enormous space suits loaded with guns and bombs. It’s almost traditional for Samus to get a new suit in every game, with her almost always starting in the Varia Suit, before slipping into something a little more... explosive. For example, you’ve got the Fusion Suit in, erm, Metroid Fusion, the Phazon Suit in Corruption and soon. Perhaps the most unusual of all of these is what is known as the ‘Justin Bailey’ suit- A two-piece swimwear set, which got its name down to a password in the first game that, when entered, put Samus in a bikini-like costume and gave you every single power-up and item in the game. Why Justin Bailey? Nobody knows. He’s not a member of the development team, not a character... There’s nothing in ‘Bailey’ and ‘Bathing Suit’, either. It’s not slag from anywhere we know, let alone Japan where the words are totally different. And don’t you dare mention Bieber.

 

Not only do Samus’ clothes change, but her general appearance does a fair bit, too. In the first Metroid game, she had ginger hair, but in every other title she’s blonde. (Except Metroid II, which was on the black-and-white GameBoy, so she had grey hair.) Why? The designers wanted her to have a golden head, but the limitations of the NES meant that it could only render so many different colours at once. As the rest had been used up by her skin tone, clothes and the background, it meant they couldn’t use the colour yellow, so Samus became a redhead. The same thing happened with Princess Peach (Or Toadstool, as she was then known) in Super Mario Bros., her golden locks becoming the same shade as Mario’s dungarees. However, when they finally got the technology to render more colours at once on the SNES, Samus became blonde in Super Metroid, a look she’s sticked with ever since. That’s not to forget her phase as a green-haired freak: The passcode Justin Bailey gives her a most irregular hair colour indeed.

Samus

Debut: Metroid (NES, 1986)

Created by: Makoto Kano (Design), Yoshio Sakamoto & Gunpei Yokoi (Character)

Number of videogame apperances: 16

Other apperances: TV (Captain N: The Games Master), Metroid Manga

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